How Good is 80CrV2 Steel? Details 80CrV2 Steel Review

What is 80CrV2 steel?

80CrV2 is a high-carbon, low-alloy steel that is widely used in knifemaking. Named after the main components of its composition, which include C for carbon, Cr Chromium and V vanadium, it is also known as CrV2 steel.

This steel has excellent edge retention and high toughness thanks to the combination of these components.

80CrV2 is the best for knives that are used in difficult applicationslike hunting or tactical knives. The 80CrV2 steel was also known as Swedish saw steel. It is made in Germany.

80CrV2 Steel Chemical composition

  • Carbon B 0.85%: Enhances edge retention, hardness and tensile strengths. It increases steel resistance to wear and abrasion as well as corrosion.
  • Chrome Cr 0.6%: Formation of Chromium carides. This increases the blade’s hardness and tensile strength as well as corrosion resistance.
  • Molybdenum Mo 0.1%: This improves machinability.
  • Vanadium V 0.25: It inhibits grain growth in high temperature processing and heat treatments, which increases the steel’s strength and toughness. It forms carbides, which increase wear resistance.
  • Nickel Ni 0.40%: Increases strength and toughness. It can increase hardenability, but not as much than other alloying elements found in steel. It has significant corrosion resistance benefits.
  • Manganese 0.50%: Increases steel’s strength and hardness. The steel’s hardenability can be improved by heating it.
  • Silicon Sil 0.30%: Increases strength, heat resistance.
  • Sulfur S 0.02%: Increases machinability.

Properties for 80CrV2 Steel

80CrV2 Steel Hardness

According to the Rockwell hardness scale, 80CrV2 has a hardness of 57-58HRC. The heat treatment used by different manufacturers can affect the hardness. High-end steel with HRC greater than 60 does not appear to have a high hardness of 57 HRC.

It is sufficient to provide steel with excellent edge retention and wear resistance.

80CrV2 Wear resistant

80CrV2 offers decent wear resistance considering it is not a very hard steel.

This steel is not as wear-resistant as high-end steel but it is more durable than low-end steel that has less hardness.

80CrV2 Steel Edge Retention

Hardness is what determines how steel will remain sharp for a long time. Steel’s ability to remain sharp for a long time depends on its hardness. This steel can handle most cutting tasks without the need to be sharpened.

It is similar to wear resistance but not as high as premium knives. However, it is high enough that you don’t need to sharpen knives made of this steel every day.

80CrV2 steel corrosion resistance

Because of its low levels of Chromium, 80CrV2 does not qualify as stainless steel. It is therefore susceptible to corrosion and rusting. This is why 80CrV2 is not the right choice if you need knives that can withstand high levels of corrosion.

This steel can be used in normal environments and will not rust if it is treated with anti-corrosion techniques.

After use, oiling and cleaning the knives are essential. Some manufacturers also apply anticorrosion coatings to the blades. This is a great option.

80CrV2 Steel Toughness

Although it isn’t a very hard steel, 80CrV2 Steel offers exceptional toughness. It also contains Chromium. This steel is strong enough to withstand high-impact and stress.

80CrV2 is an excellent choice for knives that can be used outdoors due to its toughness. They won’t break or chip and will last a long time.

Is it difficult to sharpen 80CrV2?

No! No!

This steel can be sharpened with simple abrasives such as stones or simple sharpeners. You don’t need to be a professional knife-sharpener to achieve an edge with this steel.

80CrV2 steel comparison

80CrV2 steel vs 1095

1095 steel has more carbon than 80CrV2, which makes it more durable and better at retaining edges. However, 80CrV2 is more tough.

Both steels have poor corrosion resistance and are within the budget-friendly range.

80CrV2 and 5160

80CrV2 is superior to 5160 steel in edge retention and wear resistance. This makes it a better choice for knife-making.

Is 80CrV2 a good steel for knives?

The 80CrV2 steel is great for knives due to its toughness and edge retention. It is also easy to sharpen. It is susceptible to rust, but this can be managed with proper care.

Is 80CrV2 safe for swords?

Yes, 80CRV2 Steel is an excellent choice for sword blades. However, there are some drawbacks.

Your blade will retain its hardness and edge retention due to the high carbon content and hardening process. The swords will also benefit from an increased resistance to abrasion.

You will need to work harder to shape 80CrV2 steel, as it is more hardy and can be bent after quench or during forging.

Is 80CrV2 super steel?

No, 80CrV2 can’t be considered High carbon steel because it contains more carbon than 0.50%.

It’s best suited to higher strength applications where stiffness or hardness is required. This makes it a great choice as a sword blade, survival knife, and tactical knife.

Elmax steel is considered super steel because of its extremely fine grain structure, excellent properties and exceptional strength.

Is it easy to heat treat 80CrV2?

Heat treating 80CrV2 steel is not difficult. The 1084 Steel has a nearly identical appearance to . However, you can heat treat 80CrV2 steel just like 1084 steel.

A fast oil quench in fast quench oil is the best way to heat treat a knife made of 80CrV2 and not Canola.

Heat treatment should be performed at an approximate heat of 830 0C, and then tempered immediately at around 209 0C for approximately 2 hours.

Is it possible to get a Hamon for 80CrV2?

You can make a Hamon from 80CrV2 stainless steel. However, this is not an easy task. It often depends on the skill of the knife maker.

About the author

Hi, my name is Jaba Ray. I'm a knife expert and researcher. I am the creator of thesandwichknife.com, your one-stop site for everything related to knives. I love people who need suitable steel or knife for their cook because I'm also a food lover. I work with a team of people who've always had a passion for knives and blades on this site.

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